CFA pledges support for HSE health & safety Common Strategy 2016-2021

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CFA has pledged its support for the food sector’s health and safety improvement objectives set out in the HSE’s Food & Drink Manufacture Forum’s (FDMF) Common Strategy 2016-2021.

 

The Objectives are to:

  1. Reduce the HSE RIDDOR-reportable ill-health and injury rate by 10% year-on-year (baseline 1/4/16)
  2. Manage musculoskeletal disorder risks including manual handling and upper limb disorders
  3. Have in place effective arrangements to manage slips and trips
  4. Have in place an effective occupational health management system

CFA pledges:

  • To commit CFA to working to help our industry achieve these objectives
  • To promote the Common Strategy via our website, H&S committee or via other communications
  • To benchmark our industry to track progress with the objectives and provide feedback to the FDMF
  • Our members will compile action plans that will help them address the Objectives

The Food and Drink Manufacture Forum (FDMF) is a partnership between Trade Associations, Trade Unions and HSE. CFA has been a member of the Forum since its establishment in 2004.

1/12/16

Fresh produce safety and washing

All produce, whether from the gWashing Melonsarden or commercially grown, carry microorganisms from the environment. Safety is assured by applying Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) from the seed onward, Good Hygienic Practice (GHP) from harvest and handling and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) during preparation. Washing is essential to remove the soil and debris before consumption.

Consequently, leafy salads sold as washed and ready to eat are thoroughly washed in water. The water is often chlorinated or treated with fruit acids to ensure that the leaves are as clean as possible and fit for immediate consumption without further washing.

Prewashed prepared produce does not benefit from rewashing in the home as this may result in cross-contamination, and does not further improve hygiene.

See how to handle chilled foods at home

Environmentally Acceptable Washing Methods

There is a constant development programme throughout the salad industry to find new efficient, cost effective, and environmentally acceptable washing approaches ranging from spring water washing through to the use of fruit acid based biocides and chlorine derivatives.

All washing approaches that are in commercial use have been assessed and validated as fit for purpose.

Download CFA’s Produce Wash Protocol and Produce Decontamination Assessment Protocol (Part 2: Washwater Validation).

However, CFA’s Micro Guidance for Growers sets out how to minimise the opportunity for contamination in the field through the application of HACCP systems is key to assuring the microbiological quality of salad produce.

CFA Leads on Defence of Biocides to Protect Food Safety and Hygiene

As reported in the CFA’s recent newsletters (winter 2015 and spring 2016)#Cleaning Techniques 1 - Copy (2)  two technical reviews into the use of biocides are impacting on the availability of the effective disinfectants vital to assure food hygiene through the food chain.

In response to the reviews CFA is leading the industry group which is developing guidance on the use of biocides in cleaning and disinfection, and leading lobbying at UK and with the EC.

Read press coverage of the story in Food Manufacture.

Concerns raised

Biocides in disinfectants and sanitisers are used routinely both in food production and in the home to prevent microbiological contamination of our food. They are used throughout the supply chain and are very important in the production of high quality safe food, contributing to food safety assurance and helping to protect the consumer. Concerns have been expressed repeatedly in UK official reports that clear guidance on cleaning and disinfection needs to be made available to enforcers and smaller businesses to ensure that it is being carried out properly.

The European Commission is proposing regulating the traces of such compounds in foodstuffs. The presence of a trace of biocide does not indicate that there is any risk to human health. The positive benefits of using biocides to prevent microbiological contamination needs to be balanced with the need to set practical levels.

Biocides essential to maintain food hygiene standards

Food poisoning outbreaks are rare in the UK. The UK food industry places an absolute priority on food safety. Good Agricultural Practices, hygienic preparation and packaging minimise the potential for contamination, and the use of biocides and cleaning agents play an essential role in maintaining high standards of food hygiene.

The UK food industry, led by CFA, has stressed to both UK authorities and the European Commission the need to maintain an adequate range of effective biocides and cleaning agents in order not to compromise food safety through increased microbiological risk.

 

The safety and quality of food is paramount to the industry which is working with the UK authorities and participate in discussions with the European Commission to ensure that food safety remains the key driver for any recommendations to set Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs).

Good practice for use of biocides

The positions of the food and hygiene industries on the issue are aligned, including at EU level. The main aim is now for the EC to recognise that it is not appropriate to apply MRLs as biocides used for disinfection (of water and equipment etc) are not being used as Plant Protection Products (i.e. pesticides).

Good practice approaches to the use of biocides for cleaning and disinfection are set out in the new UK Food and Biocides Industry Group guidance, which CFA leads.

Download the UK food and hygiene industry position statement.

 

 

10 March 2016. Updated 6 April 2016.

CFA’s Chilled Resources Feature in Sainsbury’s Waste less, Save more campaign

56b101629baf0_default_bigCFA has been working in partnership with Sainsbury’s to supply bespoke fridge thermometers to residents in South Derbyshire as part of the retailer’s Waste less, Save more campaign.

Sainsbury’s created their own version of the fridge thermometers that CFA offers through its Chilled Education programme. The thermometers provide customers with a simple reminder to check their fridges are at the right temperature for storing fresh food to avoid unnecessary waste.

Some 15,000 ‘Waste less, Save more’ fridge thermometers are now checking the temperature in domestic fridges in Swadlincote and the surrounding areas. Many of these customers will be contacted in a few weeks in order to assess how useful they have found the device in order to inform the campaign’s development.

Kaarin Goodburn, CFA Director explains: “Thermometers take the guesswork out of checking a fridge’s temperature but are also a way to raise awareness of the importance of correct food storage, for reasons of safety as well as quality. Sainsbury’s use of the thermometers will contribute to people’s understanding of food safety in the home, as well as reducing waste.”

 

CFA Supports Courtauld 2025 Leading the World in Sustainability

C2025_Badge_2016_RGBCFA is a founding signatory of waste reduction and sustainability charity WRAP’s Courtauld 2025 (C2025) Commitment.

The Commitment brings together food organisations – from producer to consumer – in a 10 year voluntary agreement to make food and drink production and consumption more sustainable. Its targets include: 20% reduction in food and drink waste in the UK; 20% reduction in greenhouse gas intensity of food and drink consumed in the UK and a reduction in the impact associated with water use in the supply chain.

CFA Director Kaarin Goodburn explains: “Chilled prepared food has an excellent track record in sustainability, with, for example, more than 99% of food waste diverted from landfill. So we are natural partners for WRAP in this commitment. CFA’s longstanding sustainability activity, our Chilled Education programme including advice on how best to store and use food, and our shelf life research (SUSSLE) all contribute to C2025’s aims.

Richard Swannell, Director of Sustainable Food Systems continues: “Courtauld 2025 is our most ambitious agreement yet and we are delighted that CFA has pledged their support. We are faced with big challenges – rising populations, climate change and dwindling resources. But tackling food waste offers a practical option to address these challenges and, in doing so, will create new opportunities. Only by working together can we realise the big changes that are essential to ensure a more prosperous future for individuals, businesses and the planet.”

15 March 2016

CFA’s Latest Newsletter Available

The November issue leads with CFA’s response to the Food Standards Agency’s Vacuum Packing/MAP consultation. 

It also brings news of changing faces, site visits, new members and a special award for an industry colleague.

Chilled Education is also celebrating with a bright new star, success at a major science fair and the launch of a brand new website.

 

Teaching Science Using Food – new lesson plans

CFA’s Chilled Education (CEd) partnership with the Association for Science Education (ASE) continues with the launch of four new free lesson plans exploring microbial structure of Lactobacillus in yoghurt, the effects of atmospheric gases on lettuce pinking, microbial modelling using ComBase software and genetic adaptation in relation to E. coli and C. botulinum.

These complement the existing lesson, which investigates the effect of pH on yeast growth in fruit juice. The resources have been developed by CEd with science teachers Sam Holyman (Bablake School) and Kat Stuart (Myland School) and are available through the links below:

SET 1. The effect of pH on yeast activity in fruit juice
Investigating pH and Soft_Drinks Lesson Plan.pdf
Investigating pH and Soft Drinks Student Practical Sheet.pdf
Food_Spoilage_HWK and Teacher_Notes.pdf
Investigating_How_pH_Affects_Yeast_Growth.ppt 

SET 2. Microbes in yoghurt
Yoghurt Lesson Plan.pdf
Yoghurt_Gram_Staining_Student_Prac_Sheet.pdf
Yoghurt_Bacteria_Homework.pdf
Microbes in yoghurt.ppt

SET 3: Investigating the pinking of lettuce
Investigating Lettuce Pinking Lesson  Plan.pdf
Investigating Lettuce Pinking Practical and Teachers Notes.pdf
Lettuce Pinking.ppt 
Lettuce Pinking_HWK and Teachers Notes.pdf

SET 4: Modelling microbial growth
Modelling_Microbial_Growth_Lesson_Plan.pdf
Modelling Microbe Growth Student Practical Sheet.pdf 
Modelling Microbial Growth.ppt

SET 5: Species variation and genetic adaptation

Species_variation_Lesson_Plan.pdf
Genetic_Adaptation_Student_Worksheet.pdf
Genetic_Adaptation.ppt

SET 6: DNA Structure and Modelling

DNA Structure and Modelling Lesson Plan & Teacher Notes
DNA Structure and Modelling 
DNA Structure and Modelling Practical
DNA Structure & Modelling Homework

SET 7: Microorganisms and MicroTrumps

KS2 Microorganisms and MicroTrumps – Lesson Plan
KS2 Microorganisms and MicroTrumps ppt
KS2 Extension – make more MicroTrumps (print double sided)